Chitons

Chitons differ from other molluscs by having an 8-plated shell, which is held together by a tough band of tissues known as the ‘girdle’ (this may obscure the plates in some species). All chitons have a reduced head and a large foot and are associated with rock and reef habitats where they graze algae and small invertebrates from the surface. Chitons seek shelter under rocks or in crevices, especially during low tide to minimise exposure to predators and desiccation. The various types of chitons are distinguished by colour and structural differences in the plates and girdle.

The Australian Chiton (Ischnochiton australis, length 40-50mm) is one of the commoner chiton species from the eastern southern coast of Australia. The Australian Chiton (Ischnochiton australis, length 40-50mm) is one of the commoner chiton species from the eastern southern coast of Australia.

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