Bivalves

Glory Scallop (Mimachlamys gloriosa, length 60-70mm) is a common bivalve species in Moreton Bay, southern Queensland. Glory Scallop (Mimachlamys gloriosa, length 60-70mm) is a common bivalve species in Moreton Bay, southern Queensland. Bivalves are molluscs that have a shell composed of two valves attached by a skin-like ligament and usually interlocking (hinge) teeth. The class includes many commercially significant species and numerous ecologically dominant groups. Many live in the sediments (venus clams and trough shells) and others live on the surface (mussels and oysters). The mantle, lining the inside of the shell, essentially encloses the animal. The head is vestigial and a radula (tongue ribbon) is absent. In most, the gills perform both respiratory and food-gathering roles (filter-feeding). The foot is well developed in burrowers (such as pipis), but poorly developed in attached forms like oysters and swimmers such as scallops. About 350 species have been recorded from Moreton Bay.

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